Soaking wet's Blog

Crew just passing through

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An overwhelming percentage of resumes read the same. Three months here, nine months there and absolutely no longevity. 

 

Light on experience and heavy on lifestyle questions during job interviews, Captains are forced to accept mediocracy, when their searching for excellence.

 

That's not to say GOOD CREW don't exist, but rather the MEDIOCRE CREW get jobs because yachts need to fill positions and keep going.

 

Crew willing to stick with a boat for at least one year, quickly rise through the ranks, progress and add value to their career. 

 

Earning a little more money each year is a function of dedication,  earning trust and gaining better qualifications. 

 

Yachting tolerates mediocre crew, because that's the way its always been.

 

The most difficult thing good crew do each day, is dealing with mediocre crew who are just passing through. 

 

 


Does the lack of qualified captains mean the longevity of the crew does not exist? How many captains out there have no clue how the do their job? Does blaming crew members for the lack of leadership make sense? How any captains ignore the needs of the crew?
It should be kept in mind the failure of any endeavor is usually lack of the management (captain) to provide the proper atmosphere to keep crew...so blaming crew for either seeing this in the business and leaving or seeing how too many boats are run and switching jobs. Crew problems start at the top. The "year" on the job myth only encourages poor captains to treat crew like disposable objects. Faster crew turn over adds considerable expenses to the operating budget. This in itself will eventually clear out the problems at the top. As in the yachting business there is no no training on how to be a good leader. Also keep in mind the boats that appear to keep crew are the ones that also appear to run better. I have seen too many good people leave the business after a couple years as they just get tired of the zero to hero crowd.
Posted by: Mortamus at 17/02/2017 23:12


Again this is more down to the captain who runs the yacht rather than poor crew coming through.
Zero to hero captains are the destroyer of this industry at the moment, who have no clue on management and leadership.
How often have you heard captains say “I’m just the bus driver” In an excuse not to take responsibility of being the manager of the yacht? Or tell crew just to get on with it, or “you know where the dock is” attitude?
Zero to hero captains and other unprofessional Captains don’t seem to see themselves as managers or even responsible for the welfare of their crew, often they have no consideration to the hours worked or the moral of the crew. So too often the Captains loyalty will be to the shore side manger or his own selfish needs and not to the workforce below them, their attitude is do what I ask, don’t ask questions or pack your bags and I’ll just get another guy in. That is why we have crew that just pass through. The pass through crew will most likely be the ones with the brains who recognise the badly managed yachts and don’t stick around, unlike the lemmings that stick around do whatever they are asked to do, because they are desperate for a job and will work any hours and any condition because of the great rewards that are on offer.
It really does amaze a lot of professionals that these captains who have no insight into leadership and management or running a small company are being given the responsibility to manage a multi-million asset with multi-million dollar turn overs, only have the one recognised qualification of being able to drive the vessel, let’s just think about that for a minute?
It’s like giving the CEO’S chauffeur of a multi-million dollar company the go ahead to run his company, you just wouldn’t do it so why does it happen on yachts?
Posted by: ian at 18/02/2017 13:18


There are many factors at play regarding longevity . The captain needs to develop the correct culture on board the vessel, with clear and concise goals and standards. The hiring process should be more than looking for a body; rather finding someone to join the team.The owners need to understand the importance of having a leader in the captains position.
Managers need to allow the Captains to build a team rather than impose their will from a distance.
Everyone needs to understand that millennials and Z generation crew are used to instant gratification. Choosing who to hire from these groups means you have to know what you are looking for. The majority of people can be trained, so look at personalities that fit with your program, not just experience and training.
In the end, it comes back to who the leader is. Without strong leadership, the program will lack direction and lose the commitment from crew.
Posted by: AJ at 19/02/2017 06:46


Here here AJ. Too often we are seeing boats run by managers and brokers. Now it is understandable that brokers want to keep the clients close. And managers want to control the vessel in the owners interest. But the man on the job needs the authority and ability to hire/fire/nurture the crew. Time and experience puts together a good team.
Ian this is just too true. "It really does amaze a lot of professionals that these captains who have no insight into leadership and management or running a small company are being given the responsibility to manage a multi-million asset with multi-million dollar turn overs, only have the one recognised qualification of being able to drive the vessel, let’s just think about that for a minute?
This is one major reason for crew turn over. As we all know there are many.
Posted by: Mortamus at 19/02/2017 12:29


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